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Aramid fiber home
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Aramid in composites

Aramid fiber, or known by many as Kevlar (DuPont's brand name,) belongs in a family of synthetic products characterized by strength (some five times stronger than steel on an equal weight basis) and heat-resistance (some more than 500 degrees Celcius). It is appropriate for various applications such as composites, ballistics, aerospace, automotive, protective clothing against heat/radiation/chemicals, asbestos substitute, telecommunications (optical fiber cables) and many other.

The word aramid comes from a blend of the words "aromatic" and "polyamide" and is a general term for a manufactured fiber in which the fiber forming substance is a long chain synthetic polyamide, in which at least 85% is of amide linkages (-CO-NH-) attached directly to two aromatic rings, (as defined by the U.S Federal Trade Commission.)

Three aramid fiber manufacturers share most of the aramid market worldwide: DuPont in US makes aramid under the brand name “Kevlar” and “Nomex”. Teijin in Japan makes aramid by the brand name “Twaron” and “Technora”. Last, Kolon Industries in South Korea makes aramid by the brand name “Heracron”. Fibermax Composites is a reliable Twaron and Kevlar aramid fiber processor and offers readymade fabrics, for composites and ballistic protection, with worldwide shipping capability.

 



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